EDUCATION

Ph.D., School for Marine Science and Technology, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, New Bedford, MA, USA (2014-2019)

M.S., School for Marine Science and Technology, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, New Bedford, MA, USA (2010-2013)

B.S., Marine Science, School of Atmospheric Science, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing, China (2006-2010)


PROJECTS

  • Investigating the stock structure and life history of Atlantic halibut, a Species of Concern off New England (2017; NOAA S-K Grant)

    The goal is to investigate the stock structure and life history of Atlantic halibut by tagging and collecting biological samples from halibut caught off Cape Cod. Stock structure will be investigated by observing movement traced via innovative geolocation of halibut tagged with pop-up satellite archival tags (PSATs). PSAT data will be used to reveal halibut seasonal habitat occupancy and behavior. I am charged with the development of geolocation methodology for halibut using PSAT data and interpretation of results with respect to their behavior, movements, and stock structure. This research will improve our understanding of halibut population dynamics and the status of the resource.

  • Using archival tagging data to develop geolocation methodologies (2014-present; NOAA S-K Grant)

    The geolocation process is to infer geographical locations of marine fish by comparing environmental data archived by electronic tags attached to fish with regional environmental data derived from a model and/or observations. The primary goal of this research is to develop geolocation methodologies for Northwest Atlantic groundfish based on the Hidden Markov Model, with direct application to Atlantic cod, yellowtail flounder, and monkfish.

  • Quantifying connectivity in Buzzards Bay with application to the study of recruitment variability in the bay scallop Argopecten irradians (2010–2013; Woods Hole Sea Grant)

    To investigate the extent to which the fluctuations of bay scallop population may be due to, yearly variations in the transport of scallop larvae from spawning areas to suitable juvenile habitat (settlement zones), a high-resolution hydrodynamic model was used to drive an individual-based Lagrangian tracking model of scallop larval transport. The model results identify spawning areas from which larvae have the greatest probability of transport to juvenile habitat, which can be use by fishery managers to increase scallop populations either locally or over a broad area.


PUBLICATIONS

Journal Articles

Liu, C., Bank, C., Kersula, M., Cowles, G.W., Zemeckis, D.R., Cadrin, S.X, McGuire, C. (2019), Movements of Atlantic halibut in the Gulf of Maine based on geolocation. ICES Journal of Marine Science, fsz169, doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsz169 (Editor’s Choice)

Liu, C., Cowles, G.W., Zemeckis, D.R., Fay, G., Le Bris, A., Cadrin, S.X. (2019), A hardware-accelerated particle filter for the geolocation of demersal fish. Fisheries Research, 213C(2019):160-171. doi:10.1016/j.fishres.2019.01.019. [Accepted manuscript]

Liu, C., Cowles, G., Zemeckis, D.R., Cadrin, S.X, and Dean, M.J. (2017), Validation of a hidden Markov model for the geolocation of Atlantic cod. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, 74(11): 1862-1877. doi:10.1139/cjfas-2016-0376. [Accepted manuscript]

Zemeckis, D.R., Liu, C., Cowles, G.W., Dean, M.J., Hoffman, W.S., Martins, D., and Cadrin, S.X. (2017), Seasonal movements and connectivity of an Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) spawning component in the western Gulf of Maine. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 74(6):1780–1796. doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsw190 [download PDF]

Liu, C., Cowles, G., Churchill, J. and Stokesbury, K. (2015), Connectivity of the bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Fisheries Oceanography, 24(4):364–382. doi:10.1111/fog.12114 [PDF]

DeCelles, G., Cowles, G., Liu, C., and Cadrin, S. (2015), Modeled transport of winter flounder larvae spawned in coastal waters of the Gulf of Maine. Fisheries Oceanography, 24(5):430–444. doi:10.1111/fog.12120 [request PDF]

Hall, V.A., Liu, C., and Cadrin, S.X. (2015), The impact of the second seasonal spawn on the Nantucket population of the northern bay scallop. Marine and Coastal Fisheries, 7(1):419–433. doi:10.1080/19425120.2015.1065301 [open access PDF]

Thesis/Dissertation

Liu, C. (2019). Geolocation methods for demersal fish species using archival tagging data. Ph.D. dissertation. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA.

Liu, C. (2014). Quantifying connectivity in Buzzards Bay with application to the study of recruitment variability in the bay scallop (Argopecten irradians) Master’s thesis. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Dartmouth, MA. doi:10.13140/RG.2.1.4007.6965.

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

Liu, C., Bank, C., Cowles, G., Zemeckis, D., Cadrin, S., and McGuire, C., Tagging and Geolocation of Atlantic Halibut Off Cape Cod Using Pop-up Satellite Archival Tags. American Fisheries Society 148th Annual Meeting. Aug. 2018, Atlantic City, NJ (Oral presentation)

Liu, C. and Cowles, G., A Particle Filter Geolocation Method With Hardware Acceleration For Demersal Fish. American Fisheries Society 148th Annual Meeting. Aug. 2018, Atlantic City, NJ (Poster presentation)

Liu, C., Bank, C., Cowles, G., Zemeckis, D., Cadrin, S., and McGuire, C., Pop-Up Satellite Archival Tagging and Geolocation of Atlantic Halibut off Cape Cod. American Fisheries Society Southern New England Chapter 2018 Winter Meeting. Jan. 2018, New Bedford, MA (Poster presentation)

Liu, C. and Cowles, G., A GPU-accelerated particle filter geolocation method for demersal fish using archival tagging data. ICES Annual Science Conference. Sep. 2017, Fort Lauderdale, FL (Oral presentation)

Liu, C. and Cowles, G., Developing and validating a GPU-accelerated geolocation method for groundfish using the particle filter. American Fisheries Society Southern New England Chapter 50th Anniversary Meeting. Feb. 2017, Mystic, CT (Poster presentation)

Liu, C., Cowles, G., Zemeckis, D., Cadrin, S. and Dean, M., Development and Validation of an HMM-based Geolocation Method Using Archival Tagging Data for Atlantic Cod. American Fisheries Society 146th Annual Meeting. Aug. 2016, Kansas City, MO (Oral presentation)

Liu, C., Cowles, G., Zemeckis, D., Cadrin, S. and Dean, M., Geolocation of Atlantic cod off New England using archival tagging data and hidden Markov models. International Statistical Ecology Conference. Jun. 2016, Seattle, WA (Oral presentation)

Liu, C., Cowles, G., Zemeckis, D., Cadrin, S. and Dean, M., Developing and validating geolocation methods for groundfish species off New England. 2015 The Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine (RARGOM) Annual Science Meeting. Oct. 2015, Portsmouth, NH (Poster presentation)

Liu, C., Cowles, G., Zemeckis, D. and Cadrin, S., Developing and validating geolocation methods for groundfish species off New England. American Fisheries Society 145th Annual Meeting. Aug. 2015, Portland, OR (Poster presentation)

Liu, C., Cowles, G. and Churchill, J., Quantifying Connectivity in Buzzards Bay with Application to the Study of Recruitment Variability in the Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians). American Fisheries Society Southern New England Chapter 2013 Summer Meeting. Jun. 2013, Bristol, RI (Oral presentation)

Liu, C., Cowles, G. and Churchill, J., Quantifying Connectivity in Buzzards Bay with Application to the Study of Recruitment Variability in the Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians). NOAA NEFSC 32nd Milford Aquaculture Seminar. Mar. 2012, Westbrook, CT (Poster presentation)

Other conference abstracts:

Zemeckis, D.R., Dean, M.J., Hoffman, Liu, C., Cowles, G., Martins, D., Kerr, L., Armstrong, M.P., and Cadrin, S.X. Implications of Atlantic cod seasonal movements and population connectivity for fishery management and stock assessment in the Gulf of Maine. ICES 2015 Annual Science Conference, Sep. 2015, Copenhagen, Denmark

DeCelles, G., Cowles, G., Liu, C. and Cadrin, S. Spawning site selection by winter flounder in the Gulf of Maine: Implications for connectivity and recruitment. American Fisheries Society 144th Annual Meeting, Aug. 2014, Quebec City, Canada

MEDIA

SMAST researchers employ new methods of fish geolocation. The Standard Times. Oct. 10, 2015.

Contact

email: chang[AT]changliu.co

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